Cover of: Prisoners of the Mahdi | Byron Farwell Read Online
Share

Prisoners of the Mahdi The Story of the Mahdist Revolt which Frustrated Queen Victoria"s Designs on the Sudan by Kitchener Fourteen Years Later by Byron Farwell

  • 528 Want to read
  • ·
  • 53 Currently reading

Published by Longmans in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Sudan

Subjects:

  • Mahdi,
  • Sudan -- History -- 1862-1899

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementand of the daily lives and sufferings in captivity of three European prisoners, a soldier, a merchant and a priest.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDT108.3 .F34
The Physical Object
Paginationxxii, 356 p.
Number of Pages356
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5590618M
LC Control Number67113099
OCLC/WorldCa2328236

Download Prisoners of the Mahdi

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

One of the missionaries, Father Joseph Ohrwalder, was kept prisoner of the Mahdi for ten years. He later wrote a book on his capture called: Ten Years Captivity in the Mahdi's Camp, a stirring exposé at the time. F.R. Wingate translated the book for the British public. Prisoners of the Mahdi is an exciting and informative book for anyone interested in this region of the world/5(8). A detailed account of the Mahdi revolt told by European hostages held by the Khalifa. Good focus on the daily life of these prisoners and on the inner workings of the Mahdi state. Replace the Mahdi state with the Taliban and ISIL movements of today and the story reads the same/5.   Summary: Prisoners of the Mahdi tells two stories set in late 19th century Sudan. The dramatic rise to religious and temporal power of the Mahdi, a Sudanese man claiming to be the redeemer of Islam, provides the first tale and sets the background for the second, the stories of three European captives each held for at least ten years under often brutal conditions.4/5(1).   The story of the Mahdi and his fundamentalist revolt in the Sudan in the late s is the stuff that movies are made of (ie., "Khartoum", "The Four Feathers"), but what makes this book work is its detailed description of the trials and tribulations of 3 Western prisoners of the Mahdi who survived harrowing ordeals in the Sudan but lived to tell the story.5/5(2).

  The Mahdi dead, the Khalifa Abdullahi ruled during the long hiatus which found three Europeans in extraordinary duress as prisoners: Rudolf Slatin, a soldier, who became the Khalifa's personal slave; Joseph Orwalder, a priest; and Charles Neufeld, a merchant whose defiance kept him in chains for ten : Prisoners of the Mahdi The story of the Mahdist Revolt which frustrated Queen Victoria's designs on the Sudan Hardcover – /5(8). The Mahdi dead, the Khalifa Abdullahi ruled during the long hiatus which found three Europeans in extraordinary duress as prisoners: Rudolf Slatin, a soldier, who became the Khalifa's personal slave; Joseph Orwalder, a priest; and Charles Neufeld, a merchant whose defiance kept him in chains for ten years.   Prisoners of the Mahdi; the story of the Mahdist revolt from the fall of Khartoum to the reconquest of the Sudan by Kitchener fourteen years later, and of the daily lives and sufferings in captivity of three European prisoners, a soldier, a merchant and a Pages:

A e-book Prisoners of the Mahdi (Norton Paperback) will make you to end up being smarter. You can feel more confidence if you can know about anything. But some of you think that will open or reading the book make you bored. It is not necessarily make you fun. prisoners of the mahdi by Byron Farwell ‧ RELEASE DATE: Jan. 31, In the Sudan less than one hundred years ago, spears triumphed over Remington rifles and even machine guns, at . Buy Prisoners of the Mahdi; the story of the Mahdist revolt which frustrated Queen Victoria's designs on the Sudan, humbled Egypt, and led to the fall of Khartoum, the death of Gordon, and Kitchener's victory at Omdurman fourteen years later. by Byron Farwell online at Alibris. We have new and used copies available, in 0 edition - starting at $ Page - Like a pent-up stream suddenly released, o wild Dervishes, with hideous yells, rushed upon inhabitants of Khartum, besides the 5, soldiers— all that was left of the 9, at the commencement of the siege. The only cry of these fanatical hordes was "Kenisa! Saraya!" ("To the church! the palace!") — ie the Austrian Mission Church and .